Francesca Lanza Tans: Leading effectively from home

by | Mar 19, 2020 | Articles

Leading effectively from home

In this current climate, no one knows what tomorrow will bring, let alone the next few weeks or months. But one thing we do know is that there will, at least in the short term, be a fundamental change in the way we work, as the shift to home and remote working becomes more common. And, while the physical process can be relatively straightforward with home access to phones, wi-fi, and laptops, the emotional and mental process is often overlooked, but is just as vital.

So what can leaders do to ensure continuity and connection within their teams and their businesses knowing that, for many knowledge-based functions, there will be a significant reduction in physical, face to face interaction?

Prioritise the important (not just the urgent)

A first practical step is to ensure that enough time is carved out for conversations that are not just about the urgent, but also about the important.The Eisenhower Matrix, a tool designed by US President Dwight D Eisenhower to help prioritise tasks by urgency and importance, can offer some help here. Even in normal times, we all tend to prioritise the urgent – whether or not it’s important – and often forget about what’s important, but feels less urgent. Today, given what is happening around us, it’s even more tempting to focus on the most pressing operational, logistical and financial emergencies. And while these clearly need immediate tending to, we should not lose sight of matters that are just as important. Let’s dive into a few examples.

Maintain the social fabric

The more trivial conversations you might have as a leader are a part of the everyday social fabric of a business. The ability to check in with each other – a head around the door, a coffee, a chat in the lift, those unscheduled water cooler moments – are all a critical part of that continuity of connection which can get lost when working patterns are disrupted. While these conversations may not feel urgent in the short term, they are in fact a critical ingredient, especially so for those who gain energy from these interactions. Quoting a recent Twitter feed “If we all start working from home, we need to check in on the extroverts”, it’s often this group who may begin to struggle once they are suddenly deprived of the many stimuli they ordinarily thrive on. Add to this the social isolation that will inevitably trickle into everyone’s personal life, and whack– you’ve just lost a big chunk of creativity, productivity and engagement from your team and workforce.

Ensuring you create time for social interactions and prioritising video calls over phone calls can go a long way towards ensuring you are bringing everyone (including the extroverts) along with you on your leadership ride.

Tailor your leadership

When time is of the essence, and critical decisions need to be made rapidly, it is easy to fall into the “one size must fit all” leadership trap. Sending emails out to large groups of people, chairing calls with numerous attendees might be unavoidable – but being able to balance this with an ad-hoc approach for each of your direct reports can prove to be an invaluable asset.

Knowing individual strengths, vulnerabilities and personal circumstances can allow you to tailor your leadership style and communication to each of your people, and with that bring out their best.

Communicate clearly

At a time when we are all being bombarded by news, facts, figures, stats, the quality of a leader’s communication will matter significantly more than the quantity. Uncertainty causes even the best of us to lose confidence, focus and engagement.

Setting out clear guidelines and expectations therefore becomes non-negotiable. Ensure that each of your team understands what the “ask” is, and the timing associated with that. Co-create a set of targets, ambitions and define what the standards should look like. Hold your team accountable and check in on progress, ensuring you convey a sense of support throughout.

And above all, communicate with openness and candour. Honesty and authenticity can become your most valuable relationship-building tools, at a time when people all around the world are increasingly questioning the quality of information provided to them.

Strengthen the community

If you are a CEO, a member of an ExCo or a Board, a Partner etc., chances are your calendar will be filled with opportunities to connect with a variety of people across the business, which will offer you several opportunities to feel part of a community that shares clear and up to date information. Individuals who operate two, three or more steps down in the organisational hierarchy often don’t have access to these feeds and, once off-site, might more easily feel isolated from this inner circle.

Establish platforms of communication with the broader community and carve out the time to connect at regular intervals. Turn that weekly Monday morning call into three calls spread throughout the week. Organise daily wrap-ups with your team. Have frequent briefing notes or messages circulated from the top team. Reinforce messaging around your organisational values and vision, focus them on the other side of the precipice, and remind everyone of the behaviours all should expect from each other during these challenging times. Instilling a sense of pride in being part of this community can play a big role in maintaining engagement and loyalty.

Invest in your leaders

Leverage, leverage, leverage. At a time when it’s “all hands on deck”, organisations that develop their leaders early on have a significant advantage. The more “leadership DNA” you can count on in the organisational layers below you, the more leverage you have in order to cascade messages from the top, and maintain broad based engagement, empowerment and focus.

At every level your team is tested in their leadership skills – with the right dose of support now, many may come out of this stronger than before and with a step-change in ability. Consider investing in coaching to enable your top team and leaders across the organisation to lead more effectively and with greater impact. Supporting your leaders through these challenging times will make them feel more valued and respected. And this powerful combination can have lasting positive effects, months and years after COVID-19 ceases to be a threat.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Women in the workplace: breaking free from the seven confidence blockers

Recognising the blockers like confidence and unconscious bias is the first step for women in the workplace totake ownership of our future. 

McKinsey estimates that the worldwide economy could grow by US $28 trillion by 2025 if women were equal participants in the labour force. According to Catalyst’s recent report, Fortune 500 companies with the highest representation of female board directors attained significantly higher financial performance, on average, than those with the lowest representation.

On the other hand, the recent McKinsey survey, ‘Women in the Workplace 2018’, shows that women are promoted less, paid less, given less support, have less access to senior leaders, and face more challenges, from daily micro-aggressions through to sexual harassment, in the workplace. Dame Helena Morrissey, founder of the 30% Club, which works to achieve gender-balanced company boards, believes that although ‘diversity’ is a welcome and well-worn buzzword, it’s just not translating into practice as quickly as it ought to.

With the World Economic Forum estimating that it will take 202 years to achieve equality at the current rate of change, it’s obvious that we aren’t doing enough. The data around us confirms that closing the gender gap should be a business priority but we still clearly lack workable solutions to getting more women sat around board tables.

Where gender blindness exists, so the dismantling of unconscious bias that both men and women share about women’s leadership capacity stagnates. If our companies are too slow to initiate this change, how can we help ourselves become the change we wish to see?

My years in the coaching room with senior female executives have given me the opportunity to see some common patterns that affect successful women all around the world regardless of nationality, sector, or industry. Confidence can be a deal breaker on the way up through the glass ceiling, so anything that threatens to undo our development in these areas ought to be addressed:

  1. Impostor syndrome, or feeling like a fake: In spite of qualifications or facts to the contrary, the individual feels less competent than others, believing their success is about luck or external factors, and that they will be ‘discovered’ as an impostor. They believe their well-earnt position was only achieved because they were at the right place at the right time, without the competition of better candidates, and often by chance, but never because of who they are and what they have achieved over years of hard work.
  2. Perfectionism or Nobel Prize syndrome:  Perhaps the most common pattern among women arguably stems from consistently having to be much better than their (male) counterparts only to be equal with them. Angela Merkel and Christine Lagarde have shared in interviews that they over prepare for meetings to ensure they are never caught on the back foot. Whilst the habit is not directly harmful, there should be no need for excessive preparation, especially if the men in the room do not mirror the effort. Being an over achiever means working overtime, and when this time is stolen from sleep, family, holidays and life in general, the detriment accrues.  
  3. Tiara syndrome: Rather than proudly informing their colleagues of how well they have done, a woman will wait to have their efforts recognised by others (historically and unconsciously a man), who crowns them with the metaphorical tiara of approval. They worry that openly asking for something may diminish the value of thing asked for, or even risk lowering the value of their reputation. Cultural conditioning encourages passivity, forcing her to wait and hope to be chosen. This pattern does not bode well for asking for a pay rise, or a new assignment, or a board role, especially when it involves the connotation of ‘selling yourself’.
  4. Self-doubtself-blame and self-critique: Whilst this can affect almost anyone at any time, the pattern becomes more critical when women give birth. A new mother has to juggle the conflicting emotions of responsibility and imagined neglect to both their career and newborn. This can quickly damage her professional confidence as she comes to terms with her new identity in a workplace that is more often than not unsupportive or ill-equipped to support her through the change.
  5. Envy avoidance: A self-deprecating form of self-defence to avoid criticism from others, and protect oneself from risks. If you position yourself low enough, it is unlikely that someone will try to find your mistakes and contribute to your potential failure. Since there are so few seats at the top tables for women, and from where you currently sit the landscape at the top looks so inhospitable, why risk inciting inevitable envy from both men and women. It might be safer to stay put and not to dream big.
  6. People pleasing: Women are taught from birth that they are loved for what they do rather than who they are, and as a result experience intense feelings of guilt if they let others down, developing a reliance on the approval of others for self-esteem. As Sheryl Sandberg has shown, there is a negative correlation for women between success and likability. The more successful men become, the more they are liked by both men and women, but the more successful women become the less they are liked. This is an unbearable situation for a people pleaser. 
  7. Not negotiating: Studies have shown that women negotiate far better for their companies than they do for themselves. This pattern has the same root cause as Tiara syndrome – that women find it difficult to ask for something without feeling that it is deserved or approved of by others. Equally, women are more likely to give away what they do have for free. Research shows that women are easier to ask favours from with no return, whereas men are offered reimbursement. Saying no is a vital skill in negotiating that too few women feel able to implement.

If any of these patterns of behaviour feel familiar to you… you are not alone! By recognising these partially unconscious behaviours, we stand a better chance of changing our attitudes towards a more confident future.

Every morning we get up and look in the mirror and chose to lead, to work, to add value to our lives and the world around us, and most importantly to the future of our children. 

We are doing more than just coping, more than just surviving; we are flourishing and choosing to continue on the long road to gender parity, even if the burden of redistributing equality is still unfairly loaded on our own shoulders.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Women in the workplace: breaking free from the seven confidence blockers

Recognising the blockers like confidence and unconscious bias is the first step for women in the workplace totake ownership of our future. 

McKinsey estimates that the worldwide economy could grow by US $28 trillion by 2025 if women were equal participants in the labour force. According to Catalyst’s recent report, Fortune 500 companies with the highest representation of female board directors attained significantly higher financial performance, on average, than those with the lowest representation.

On the other hand, the recent McKinsey survey, ‘Women in the Workplace 2018’, shows that women are promoted less, paid less, given less support, have less access to senior leaders, and face more challenges, from daily micro-aggressions through to sexual harassment, in the workplace. Dame Helena Morrissey, founder of the 30% Club, which works to achieve gender-balanced company boards, believes that although ‘diversity’ is a welcome and well-worn buzzword, it’s just not translating into practice as quickly as it ought to.

With the World Economic Forum estimating that it will take 202 years to achieve equality at the current rate of change, it’s obvious that we aren’t doing enough. The data around us confirms that closing the gender gap should be a business priority but we still clearly lack workable solutions to getting more women sat around board tables.

Where gender blindness exists, so the dismantling of unconscious bias that both men and women share about women’s leadership capacity stagnates. If our companies are too slow to initiate this change, how can we help ourselves become the change we wish to see?

My years in the coaching room with senior female executives have given me the opportunity to see some common patterns that affect successful women all around the world regardless of nationality, sector, or industry. Confidence can be a deal breaker on the way up through the glass ceiling, so anything that threatens to undo our development in these areas ought to be addressed:

  1. Impostor syndrome, or feeling like a fake: In spite of qualifications or facts to the contrary, the individual feels less competent than others, believing their success is about luck or external factors, and that they will be ‘discovered’ as an impostor. They believe their well-earnt position was only achieved because they were at the right place at the right time, without the competition of better candidates, and often by chance, but never because of who they are and what they have achieved over years of hard work.
  2. Perfectionism or Nobel Prize syndrome:  Perhaps the most common pattern among women arguably stems from consistently having to be much better than their (male) counterparts only to be equal with them. Angela Merkel and Christine Lagarde have shared in interviews that they over prepare for meetings to ensure they are never caught on the back foot. Whilst the habit is not directly harmful, there should be no need for excessive preparation, especially if the men in the room do not mirror the effort. Being an over achiever means working overtime, and when this time is stolen from sleep, family, holidays and life in general, the detriment accrues.  
  3. Tiara syndrome: Rather than proudly informing their colleagues of how well they have done, a woman will wait to have their efforts recognised by others (historically and unconsciously a man), who crowns them with the metaphorical tiara of approval. They worry that openly asking for something may diminish the value of thing asked for, or even risk lowering the value of their reputation. Cultural conditioning encourages passivity, forcing her to wait and hope to be chosen. This pattern does not bode well for asking for a pay rise, or a new assignment, or a board role, especially when it involves the connotation of ‘selling yourself’.
  4. Self-doubtself-blame and self-critique: Whilst this can affect almost anyone at any time, the pattern becomes more critical when women give birth. A new mother has to juggle the conflicting emotions of responsibility and imagined neglect to both their career and newborn. This can quickly damage her professional confidence as she comes to terms with her new identity in a workplace that is more often than not unsupportive or ill-equipped to support her through the change.
  5. Envy avoidance: A self-deprecating form of self-defence to avoid criticism from others, and protect oneself from risks. If you position yourself low enough, it is unlikely that someone will try to find your mistakes and contribute to your potential failure. Since there are so few seats at the top tables for women, and from where you currently sit the landscape at the top looks so inhospitable, why risk inciting inevitable envy from both men and women. It might be safer to stay put and not to dream big.
  6. People pleasing: Women are taught from birth that they are loved for what they do rather than who they are, and as a result experience intense feelings of guilt if they let others down, developing a reliance on the approval of others for self-esteem. As Sheryl Sandberg has shown, there is a negative correlation for women between success and likability. The more successful men become, the more they are liked by both men and women, but the more successful women become the less they are liked. This is an unbearable situation for a people pleaser. 
  7. Not negotiating: Studies have shown that women negotiate far better for their companies than they do for themselves. This pattern has the same root cause as Tiara syndrome – that women find it difficult to ask for something without feeling that it is deserved or approved of by others. Equally, women are more likely to give away what they do have for free. Research shows that women are easier to ask favours from with no return, whereas men are offered reimbursement. Saying no is a vital skill in negotiating that too few women feel able to implement.

If any of these patterns of behaviour feel familiar to you… you are not alone! By recognising these partially unconscious behaviours, we stand a better chance of changing our attitudes towards a more confident future.

Every morning we get up and look in the mirror and chose to lead, to work, to add value to our lives and the world around us, and most importantly to the future of our children. 

We are doing more than just coping, more than just surviving; we are flourishing and choosing to continue on the long road to gender parity, even if the burden of redistributing equality is still unfairly loaded on our own shoulders.